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10 breeds to consider (continued)

ragdoll

Ragdoll

personality
People-oriented, sweet, docile and relaxed.

activity level
Active and playful; may be trained to walk on a lead or retrieve; enjoys owner interaction.

other pets
Sociable with other pets.

regular care
Long coat – groom every second day.

suits
An indoor environment; good with children.

russian blue


 

Russian Blue

personality
Gentle, reserved, elegant, intelligent and sensitive and quiet.

activity level
Moderately active; playful but not highly active, prefers indoor environment.
other pets
Prefers cats of a similar temperament and quiet dogs.

regular care
Short coat – groom weekly.

suits
A tranquil indoor life, with adults or families with quiet children.

siamese

   

Siamese

personality
Intelligent, extroverted, demanding, noisy, devoted and affectionate.

activity level
Highly energetic and active; owner interaction essential.
other pets
Accepts other pets if accustomed from an early age.

regular care
Short coat – groom weekly.

suits
Devoted adult households or those with gentle children; often bonds to a single person.

tonkinese

 
Tonkinese
personality
Energetic, intelligent, mischievous and dog-like.

activity level
Active and playful; enjoys playing games and owner interaction.
other pets 
Tolerant of gentle pets.

regular care
Minimal shedding sparse coat – occasional brushing or wipe down.

suits 
Attentive owners, active households of all ages, including families with children.

domestic shorthair / longhair

 
Domestic

The Domestic, or “moggie”, is the most common variety of cat in Australia. Unlike the pedigreed cat, the Domestic has no defined parentage and so this is the most diverse grouping of cats. Domestics come in every colour and coat length, and their personalities range from timid to extremely confi  dent, and from highly active to couch potatoes.

As early as the 19th century, organised studies and individual opinion linked coat colour to temperament. For example, tortoiseshell cats are frequently said to be temperamental, white cats timid and black and white cats outgoing. While popular opinion may support these generalisations, the diversity of the Domestic means that just as many individuals do not fit the pattern.

With such diverse breeding, it may be difficult to predict the final personality in a young kitten. The way a kitten is socialised and its early experiences can contribute to its adult behaviour, so many cat owners like to start “from scratch” with a young kitten. When personality, rather than appearance, is of primary importance, selecting an older cat – from five months onward or even an adult cat – may allow more accurate personality assessment.

Regardless of temperament, the Domestic is a popular and hardy cat, untroubled by most of the inherited health problems that selective breeding can create in some purebred cats.

 

other cat breeds to consider

There are many cat breeds available in Australia.

The breeds listed here are suggestions only, developed in close consultation with cat experts. They have been selected as being better suited to living in apartments and townhouses. Please note, however, that the selections are based on Australian city lifestyles and the selected breeds are a guide only. Your final selection of a pet should only be made after consultation with breeders or shelter staff, and your own careful assessment of the pet’s suitability for your lifestyle. We undertake no liability and give no warranty in relation to the selected breed.